Wimps - curious about astronomy?

Cheyenne Murphy asked a question: Wimps - curious about astronomy?
Asked By: Cheyenne Murphy
Date created: Mon, May 17, 2021 3:20 AM

Content

FAQ

Those who are looking for an answer to the question «Wimps - curious about astronomy?» often ask the following questions:

❓ ``curious about astronomy?

The sun's face is many times larger than the Earth's. The light from the sun reaches us as parallel beams. When it's a bit cloudy with gaps between the clouds the beams seem to come from a light source (the sun) just up in the atmosphere and the beams are spread out at angles as if the light source is just a short distance up.

❓ Astronomy links - curious about astronomy?

Astronomy Links. Although there are many good astronomy links, the purpose of this page is to list a couple dozen great websites that have information on many different areas of astronomy or space science. We tried to avoid listing sites that contain a lot of detail about one specific topic only.

❓ [53.10] ``curious about astronomy?

Both the Earth and the Moon orbit around the Earth-Moon center of mass, but the Earth has a much smaller orbit because it is much heavier. The size of the wobble can be computed from the Earth-Moon distance multiplied by the mass ratio, which gives around 5,000 km (slightly less than the Earth's radius, 0.003% of the Earth's distance to the Sun).

9 other answers

Ask an Astronomer is run by volunteers in the Astronomy Department at Cornell University. We answer your astronomy questions. Please browse our archive first.

WIMPs are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, hypothetical particles which may be the main (or only) component of Dark Matter, a form of matter which emits and absorbs no light and which ...

So lots of folks are looking for just that ringing. Caltech has an experiment running called Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, or CDMS.Deep underneath northwest Minnesota, 2400 feet (730 meters) down, is a laboratory that contains cryogenically cooled detectors, kept to within a hair's-breadth of absolute zero.Billions of WIMPs pass through the detector every second, but it's likely that only one ...

Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are hypothetical particles that are one of the proposed candidates for dark matter.There exists no clear definition of a WIMP, but broadly, a WIMP is a new elementary particle which interacts via gravity and any other force (or forces), potentially not part of the Standard Model itself, which is as weak as or weaker than the weak nuclear force, but ...

Curiosity Astronomy . [email protected] ©2020 by Curiosity Astronomy Club ...

Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano Harry Nelson Gray Rybka. On November 20 from 12 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. PST (20:00 to 20:30 UTC), Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano, Harry Nelson and Gray Rybka will answer your ...

Page 4 of 4 - No WIMPS! - posted in Science! Astronomy & Space Exploration, and Others: Ive been interviewed for years by reporters (print and TV) about subjects related to my field of expertise (not physics or astrophysics I regret to say), and since my field includes an understanding of how popular media work, I am always very careful.

The Biggest Astronomy Stories of 2014 By Calla Cofield 23 December 2014 An artist's concept of Kepler-186f, the first Earth-sized planet found orbiting in the habitable zone of its parent star.

Dark stars could further be distinguished from other cosmic bodies in the early universe by the type of light they give off. Dark stars are relatively cool — only around 10,000 kelvins (17,500 ...

Your Answer

We've handpicked 24 related questions for you, similar to «Wimps - curious about astronomy?» so you can surely find the answer!

Careers in astronomy - curious about astronomy?

Astronomers and Telescope Operators in the VLTI control room. Astronomers spend most of their time working with computers. When many people picture an astronomer at work, they think of someone huddling in a cold, dark observatory, squinting through a telescope. Luckily, this is one hardship astronomers no longer have to endure.

Read more

What are wimps astronomy?

WIMPs are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, hypothetical particles which may be the main (or only) component of Dark Matter, a form of matter which emits and absorbs no light and which...

Read more

Accretion disks - curious about astronomy?

Ask an Astronomer is run by volunteers in the Astronomy Department at Cornell University. Most of us are graduate students at Cornell, and all of us do this voluntarily, in our own time, fitting it in around our other work.

Read more

Black holes - curious about astronomy?

The inner disks of supermassive black holes reach thousands of degrees Kelvin (similar to the temperatures at the surface of a hot star), while smaller black holes can heat their disks to millions of degrees, where they emit in the x-ray part of the spectrum. Black holes, therefore, are some of the brightest objects around.

Read more

Cepheid variables - curious about astronomy?

Cepheid Variables. Enter Part of Title. Display # 5 10 15 20 25 30 50 100 All. 20. How can we measure distances to more stars? (Intermediate) How do we know what parameters to use when simulating the collision of the Milky Way and Andromeda? (Advanced) How fast is the Universe expanding?

Read more

Copyright notice - curious about astronomy?

You are free to reproduce any material on this site for educational or other noncommercial purposes as long as you give us proper credit (by referring to "Curious …

Read more

Coriolis effect - curious about astronomy?

Ask an Astronomer is run by volunteers in the Astronomy Department at Cornell University. Most of us are graduate students at Cornell, and all of us do this voluntarily, in our own time, fitting it in around our other work. Please take the time to browse our site and first try to use the resources online to find an answer to your question.

Read more

Density wave - curious about astronomy?

Ask an Astronomer is run by volunteers in the Astronomy Department at Cornell University. Most of us are graduate students at Cornell, and all of us do this …

Read more

Escape velocity - curious about astronomy?

Astronomy in the Arts Tag Cloud Focal Length Climate Position Aurora Homogeneity Schwarzschild Radius Radio Astronomy Singularities Reflection Sunlight Calendars Blueshifts Eclipses Spacesuits Brown Dwarfs Spectrometer Redshift End of the World Asteroids Escape Velocity

Read more

For teachers - curious about astronomy?

For Teachers. Ask an Astronomer can be a great resource for the classroom, and we encourage questions from teachers and students! As you can imagine, the needs of students and teachers are a bit different from the needs of individual curious people, so we ask that educators review this page. Using the Ask an Astronomer page can be a lesson, not ...

Read more

General physics - curious about astronomy?

Physics and Astronomy Isaac Newton provided one of the first examples of the link between physics and astronomy in the 17th century, when he reasoned that the force of gravity which pulls objects to the Earth is the same force which keeps the Earth and other planets in orbit around the sun.

Read more

Legal information - curious about astronomy?

If you are interested in reproducing material on this site for commercial purposes or if you have any other questions about this copyright notice, please contact us at: curious[at]astro[dot]cornell[dot]edu. Disclaimer. The Ask an Astronomer website is designed and run primarily by graduate students at Cornell University, purely on a volunteer basis. Though we try to be as accurate and complete as possible with each answer, we cannot guarantee that all of them are correct.

Read more

Most recent - curious about astronomy?

Ask an Astronomer is run by volunteers in the Astronomy Department at Cornell University. Most of us are graduate students at Cornell, and all of us do this voluntarily, in our own time, fitting it in around our other work. Please take the time to browse our site and first try to use the resources online to find an answer to your question.

Read more

Radioactive decay - curious about astronomy?

Radioactive Decay. How do we know the age of the Universe and the Earth? (Intermediate) How does melting a material reset its radioactive clock? (Intermediate) Why is Earth's core molten? (Intermediate)

Read more

Solar system - curious about astronomy?

Our Solar System. The Sun. General Questions. When the Sun converts mass to energy, do the orbits of the planets change? (Advanced) How long does it take for the …

Read more

The sun - curious about astronomy?

The Sun is not only the dominant object in the sky during the day, but it is the source of virtually all of the light and the heat that fuels life on Earth. In addition, the Sun provides an excellent opportunity for astronomers to deepen their understanding of stellar phenomena. Fundamentals: the Sun as a Star. Credit: SOHO (ESA + NASA) The X-ray Sun.

Read more

Tidal friction - curious about astronomy?

Is Earth-moon tidal friction causing global warming? (Intermediate) Is the distance from the Earth to the Sun changing? (Advanced) Is the Moon moving away from the Earth? When was this discovered? (Intermediate) The Moon slows the Earth's rotation, but how fast was it spinning billions of years ago? (Intermediate)

Read more

Astronomy in the arts - curious about astronomy?

Astronomy in the Arts Visual Arts. Astronomical references in architecture is more common than you might think. The day/night and seasonal... Performing Arts. Astronomy is a common musical subject. While there is no little sound in space, humans have been making... Literary Arts. Non-fiction ...

Read more

The history of astronomy - curious about astronomy?

Early astronomy was a mix of careful observation of the positions and motions of the heavenly bodies, religion, and astrology. The Greeks named the stars and plotted their positions. While Europe muddled through the Dark Ages, astronomers in the Middle East translated Greek texts into Arabic, preserving and expanding humanity's knowledge of the sky.

Read more

What are wimps in astronomy?

Weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP), heavy, electromagnetically neutral subatomic particle that is hypothesized to make up most dark matter and therefore some 22 percent of the universe… The absence of light from these particles also indicates that they are electromagnetically neutral.

Read more

Ask a question - curious about astronomy?

Ask a Question We are happy to answer your questions about astronomy, but we ask that you first search our site and browse our Q&A archive on the side bar to see what information is already available about the topic you're interested in. Please only send us a question if you don't find what you are looking for. Rules for submitting a question

Read more

Black holes & quasars - curious about astronomy?

Artist's impression of ULAS J1120+0641, a distant quasar. This artist’s impression shows how ULAS J1120+0641, a very distant quasar powered by a black hole with a mass two billion times that of the Sun, may have looked. This quasar is the most distant yet found and is seen as it was just 770 million years after the Big Bang.

Read more

Lunar & solar eclipses - curious about astronomy?

Because the shadow cast by the Earth is quite a bit larger than the Moon, lunar eclipses are more common than solar eclipses, and totality can last for about an hour. Nonetheless, the beauty of such events entices both professional and amateur astronomers alike to chase them all around the globe! Questions About Lunar and Solar Eclipses

Read more

Seti & extraterrestrial life - curious about astronomy?

Life in our Solar System. Credit: Colby Gutierrez-Kraybill Allen Telescope Array. Front view of antennas of the Allen Telescope Array, a radio telescope for combined radio astronomy and SETI (search for extraterrestrial intelligence) research being built by the University of California at Berkeley, outside San Francisco.

Read more